Boom Baby!

Let’s define Boom Baby!

First, there’s the Southpark Episode with one of the most recent uses of Boom Baby! I embedded the appropriate video clip below from the episode - About Last Night – because, you know, those guys surely won’t mind.

1960′s.

Definitions

Of course, the Urban Dictionary simply says Boom Baby! is something to say when something really incredible happens. Of course, the clip above illustrates that pretty well.

Is It About Boomers?

A lot of times, the words are reversed, and it is associated with baby boomers. This is the generation born after WWII to the early 1960′s. Of course, the definitions and exact years vary a bit, but it was a time of a relatively high birth rate. The younger members of that generation became hippies, and then yuppies, and then the generation that the younger generation complains about – as younger generations always do.

In Fiction!

Hey, what about fictional Baby Boomer Walter White. Hey could have said Boom Baby when he blew up Gus, right? I guess you can say Boom Baby when you are Breaking Bad too.

In Sports!

Boomer Sooners is something people in Oklahoma say when they are talking about OU sports.

So, What Are Boomers?

But baby boomers are different. Apparently the phrase was not coined until it was used in a Washington Post article in 1970.

  • The U.S. Census Bureau says birthdays from 1946 to 1964 are correct.
  • That is actually a pretty long period, and many people further divide this generation into 2 sections.
  • The first group would be born until 1955, and they would be old enough to have clear memories of the Vietnam era.
  • The second group would be born in 1956 and beyond.

Anyway, these are pretty US-centric definitions, and Canadians, the British, and Australians have slightly different definitions as their post-war birth booms were slightly different. In any case, this population affected changes from The U.S. to India. Yes, while American boomers were protesting the war, Indian boomers were making philosophical changes. India is different than other large English speaking countries, but similar too.

In countries like China, the generational shift happened later, is more pronounced for people born in the 1980′s and beyond. The South Korean post-war generation came after the Korean Conflict, and not WWII.

Hey, is it real, or is it just fantasy?

Leave a Reply